Tuesday, December 11News That Matters

Tag: FCC

FCC investigates FCC chairman Pai over potential 'improper coordination' with Sinclair Broadcasting

FCC investigates FCC chairman Pai over potential 'improper coordination' with Sinclair Broadcasting

Politics
The inspector general of the Federal Communications Commission is investigating the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai, for possibly having worked just a little to closely with far-right media conglomerate Sinclair Broadcasting in its attempt to purchase Tribune Media. WASHINGTON — Last April, the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai, led the charge for his agency to approve rules allowing television broadcasters to greatly increase the number of stations they own. A few weeks later, Sinclair Broadcasting announced a blockbuster $3.9 billion deal to buy Tribune Media — a deal those new rules made possible. By the end of the year, in a previously undisclosed move, the top internal watchdog for the F.C.C. opened an investigation into whether M
Bitcoin miner in NYC home interfered with T-Mobile network, FCC says

Bitcoin miner in NYC home interfered with T-Mobile network, FCC says

Technology
Enlarge / An Antminer S5. (credit: Bitmain) A New York City resident was ordered to turn off his bitcoin miner after the Federal Communications Commission discovered that it was interfering with T-Mobile's wireless network. After receiving a complaint from T-Mobile about interference to its 700MHz LTE network in Brooklyn, New York, FCC agents in November 2017 determined that radio emissions in the 700MHz band were coming from the residence of a man named Victor Rosario. "When the interfering device was turned off the interference ceased," the FCC's enforcement bureau told Rosario in a "Notification of Harmful Interference" yesterday. "You identified the device as an Antminer S5 Bitcoin Miner. The device was generating spurious emissions on frequencies assigned to T-Mobile's broadband ne...
SpaceX’s satellite broadband nears FCC approval and first test launch

SpaceX’s satellite broadband nears FCC approval and first test launch

Technology
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | Olena_T) SpaceX's satellite broadband plans are getting closer to reality. The company is about to launch two demonstration satellites, and it is on track to get the Federal Communications Commission's permission to offer satellite Internet service in the US. Neither development is surprising, but they're both necessary steps for SpaceX to enter the satellite broadband market. SpaceX is one of several companies planning low-Earth orbit satellite broadband networks that could offer much higher speeds and much lower latency than existing satellite Internet services. Today, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai proposed approving SpaceX's application "to provide broadband services using satellite technologies in the United States and on a global basis," a commission announc...
FCC report finds almost no broadband competition at 100Mbps speeds

FCC report finds almost no broadband competition at 100Mbps speeds

Technology
Enlarge (credit: Getty Images | jangeltun) If you live in the US and want home Internet service at speeds of at least 100Mbps, you will likely find one Internet service provider in your area or none at all. The latest Internet Access Services report was released by the Federal Communications Commission last week. The report's broadband competition chart finds that 44 percent of developed Census blocks had zero home broadband providers offering download speeds of at least 100Mbps and upload speeds of at least 10Mbps. Forty-one percent of developed Census blocks had one ISP offering such speeds, for a total of 85 percent with zero or one ISP. The remaining 15 percent had two or three providers at that level as of the end of 2016. That's up a bit from June 30, 2016, when about 12 percent o...
Sorry, FCC: Charter will lower investment after net neutrality repeal

Sorry, FCC: Charter will lower investment after net neutrality repeal

Technology
Enlarge (credit: Steve Johnson) The Federal Communications Commission's quest to prove that killing net neutrality is somehow raising broadband investment recently focused on Charter Communications. Charter, the second largest US cable company after Comcast, "is investing more in its broadband network and workforce because of the FCC's Restoring Internet Freedom Order [that repealed net neutrality rules] and last year's tax reform legislation," FCC Chief of Staff Matthew Berry claimed in a tweet Friday. But as we noted earlier this week, Charter raised its capital investment in 2017 while the net neutrality rules were in place. And with the repeal soon to take effect, Charter says it is preparing for a "meaningful decline" in spending on building and upgrading broadband networks. Read 2...