Tuesday, August 14News That Matters

Technology

Elit scripta volumus cu vim, cum no vidit prodesset interesset. Mollis legendos ne est, ex pri latine euismod apeirian. Nec molestie senserit an, eos no eirmod salutatus.

Cryptocurrency-mining criminals that netted $3 million gear up for more

Cryptocurrency-mining criminals that netted $3 million gear up for more

Technology
Enlarge / Money. (credit: AMC) Researchers have uncovered what they said is one of the biggest malicious currency mining operations ever, with more than $3 million worth of digital coin. Now, the operators are gearing up to make more. The unknown criminals generated the windfall over the past 18 months. The campaign has mainly exploited critical vulnerabilities on Windows computers and then, once gaining control over them, installing a modified version of XMRig, an open-source application that mines the digital coin known as Monero. While the group has used a variety of mining services, it has continued to dump the proceeds into a single wallet. As of last week, the wallet had received payouts of almost 10,829 Monero, which, at current valuations, are worth more than $3.4 million. "The ...
Residential solar is cheap, but can it get cheaper? Paths to $0.05 per kWh

Residential solar is cheap, but can it get cheaper? Paths to $0.05 per kWh

Technology
Tesla smooth black glass solar roof tiles. (credit: Tesla) The price of solar panels has fallen far and fast. But the Energy Department (DOE) wants to bring those costs down even further, especially for residential homes. After all, studies have shown that if every inch of useable rooftop in the US had solar panels on it, the panels could provide about 40% of the nation's power demand. Right now, the DOE's goal is residential solar that costs 5¢ per kilowatt hour by 2030. In a new report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), researchers mapped out some possible pathways to that goal. Notably, the biggest barriers to cost reduction appear to be the stubborn "soft costs" of solar installation. Those soft costs include supply chain costs, labor costs, and sales and m
Good news: Chrome debuts automatic blocking of annoying ads

Good news: Chrome debuts automatic blocking of annoying ads

Technology
Enlarge (credit: Daniel Oines) Google developers this week debuted a long-anticipated feature in Chrome that automatically blocks one of the Internet's biggest annoyances—intrusive ads. Starting on Thursday, Chrome started filtering ads that fail to meet a set of criteria laid out by the Coalition for Better Ads, an industry group. The organization is made up of Google and others, and it aims to improve people's experiences with online ads. In a post published Wednesday, Chrome Engineering Manager Chris Bentzel said the filtering will focus on ad types that were ranked the most intrusive by 40,000 Internet uses who participated in a survey. On computers, the ads include those involving: pop-ups auto-playing videos with audio "prestitials" that cover the screen that include a countdown
How The Drone Industry Evolve In 2018

How The Drone Industry Evolve In 2018

Technology
Drones are a perfect example of how our technology has evolved and will continue to grow in the future. So, what exactly does it offer? For casual users, it is just a fun toy. However, drones have use cases in multiple fields, including safety, health, and industry. Until now, drones have gone on a wild ride. It has been massively regulated by U.S. government considering the threats that it brings including spying. Moreover, drone safety had been a significant issue. But to completely understand drones, we need to understand both its advantages and disadvantages before making a final call on how they should be regulated. For starters, there are good drones and destructive drones. Those drones that are created for good are being used to save lives, help improve business efficiency and use ...
Bitcoin miner in NYC home interfered with T-Mobile network, FCC says

Bitcoin miner in NYC home interfered with T-Mobile network, FCC says

Technology
Enlarge / An Antminer S5. (credit: Bitmain) A New York City resident was ordered to turn off his bitcoin miner after the Federal Communications Commission discovered that it was interfering with T-Mobile's wireless network. After receiving a complaint from T-Mobile about interference to its 700MHz LTE network in Brooklyn, New York, FCC agents in November 2017 determined that radio emissions in the 700MHz band were coming from the residence of a man named Victor Rosario. "When the interfering device was turned off the interference ceased," the FCC's enforcement bureau told Rosario in a "Notification of Harmful Interference" yesterday. "You identified the device as an Antminer S5 Bitcoin Miner. The device was generating spurious emissions on frequencies assigned to T-Mobile's broadband ne...
Raw sockets backdoor gives attackers complete control of some Linux servers

Raw sockets backdoor gives attackers complete control of some Linux servers

Technology
(credit: Jeremy Brooks) A stealthy backdoor undetected by antimalware providers is giving unknown attackers complete control over at least 100 Linux servers that appear to be used in business production environments, warn researchers. In a blog post published Wednesday, Montreal-based GeoSecure claimed that a piece of malware dubbed "Chaos" is infecting poorly secured systems by guessing weak passwords protecting secure shell application administrators use to remotely control Unix-based computers. Normally, firewalls in front of servers block such backdoors from communicating with the outside Internet. Chaos bypasses those protections by using what's known as a "raw socket" to covertly monitor all data sent over the network. "With Chaos using a raw socket, the backdoor can be triggered