Sunday, February 25News That Matters

Tag: public

This week in the war on workers: Who will be hurt most if Supreme Court rules against public unions?

This week in the war on workers: Who will be hurt most if Supreme Court rules against public unions?

Politics
Who’s going to lose out the most if (when) the Supreme Court deals a body blow to public sector unions in the Janus case?  While the outcome of the case will affect about 17 million public-sector workers across the country, black women in particular could be hurt by Janus, as they are disproportionately represented in public sector jobs. They make up 17.7 percent of public-sector workers, or about 1.5 million workers. Black women have traditionally faced a double pay gap—a gender pay gap and a racial wage gap. EPI research has shown that black women are paid only 65 cents of the dollar that their white male counterparts are paid. However, unions help reduce these pay gaps. Working black women in unions are paid 94.9 percent of what their black male counterparts make, while nonunion blac
Trump puts public school safety and trauma counseling funding on the chopping block

Trump puts public school safety and trauma counseling funding on the chopping block

Politics
With school mass shootings on the rise across the country, the Trump administration is proposing major funding cuts for violence prevention and recovery assistance programs at public schools. Funds targeted for reduction or elimination in President Donald Trump’s FY’19 budget request, which was released two days before the tragedy at a high school in Parkland, Florida, have helped pay for counselors in schools and violence prevention programs. In fact, the funding levels sought by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos would “completely abdicate responsibility” for school safety, violence prevention, and recovery, according to a report released Friday by the Center for American Progress (CAP). Immediately after Wednesday’s mass shooting, DeVos called on Congress to h
St. Louis police chief, public safety director answer questions at public forum

St. Louis police chief, public safety director answer questions at public forum

Breaking News
ST. LOUIS, Mo. - Dozens of people came out to Washington Tabernacle M.B. Church downtown on Friday evening to hear from St. Louis Police Chief John Hayden and Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards. It was a chance for members of the public to ask the two questions about their plans for a safer city and to express concerns they have about crime. Chief Hayden talked about his plans to help improve the relationship between the public and the city's police department. He said he wants his officers to spend more time in the schools, creating a healthy and positive relationship early on in a child's life. "I am looking forward to a St. Louis that doesn’t have to always explain why we are top four or top five or the top most violent city in the country," Hayden said. The chief said the police de
School shooter will offer to plead guilty, public defender says

School shooter will offer to plead guilty, public defender says

Breaking News
Confessed Florida school shooter Nikolas Cruz intends to plead guilty, Broward County Public Defender Howard Finkelstein said Friday. Finkelstein said the object is to avoid a painful trial and for Cruz not to get the death penalty. Prosecutors could not immediately be reached for comment. [Previous story, published at 6:47 p.m. ET] Anguish and sorrow were giving way to anger Friday as the families of some of the 17 people killed in a South Florida high school lament what they say is inaction on gun control and school security, even as more signs emerged that authorities missed chances to intervene weeks beforehand. The FBI said it failed to act on a January tip about Nikolas Cruz, the former student who police say confessed to committing Wednesday’s massacre at Marjory Stoneman Doug...
St. Louis public school grad wins prestigious Presidential Scholarship

St. Louis public school grad wins prestigious Presidential Scholarship

Breaking News
ST. LOUIS - Elizabeth Maya received the surprise of a lifetime when she attended an assembly at her school Thursday. Representatives from Maryville University presented Maya with a check for $144,632. More than 550 students, including Maya, competed for various scholarships at Maryville a few weeks ago, but Maya was honored with the Presidential Scholarship. It not only covers tuition but room and board, too. Prospective students had to have a 3.75 GPA or a score of 27 on the ACT to qualify for the competition then go through a round of private interviews with university officials. Maya, a senior at Collegiate School of Medicine and Bio-Science Magnet High School, plans to become a veterinarian. She is the first student from the St. Louis Public School District to secure the prestigious a...
Mice infested apartments still plague Clinton Peabody Public housing complex

Mice infested apartments still plague Clinton Peabody Public housing complex

Breaking News
ST. LOUIS – The latest in the You Paid For It Team's continuing investigation of the mice infestation at Clinton Peabody Public housing complex in South St Louis is still ongoing. A tenant tells investigator Elliott Davis that she was moved from one mice infested apartment to another and that she's not getting enough help to cope with the problem. We first exposed the massive mice infestation at the complex of about 30 buildings and nearly 300 tenants last August. Now the St. Louis Housing Authority is under a microscope over its handling of the problem from the St. Louis Health Department. It's cited the Housing Authority for numerous violations and demanded that it bring in more professional help to get the problem solved. We questioned Housing Authority Executive Director Cheryl Lovell
Author Shaka Senghor to speak at Southfield Public Library

Author Shaka Senghor to speak at Southfield Public Library

Breaking News
In 1991, Detroiter Shaka Senghor went to prison on a 19-year sentence for a murder committed during his drug-dealing days. He was only 19, and a father of two. But Senghor did not remain in prison. After receiving a letter from his son, Senghor turned his life around. His memoir, Writing My Wrongs: Life, Death and Redemption in an American Prison, became a New York Times bestseller, and he has gone on to give TED Talks and appear on Oprah, CNN, CBS This Morning, The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, and other shows. Now, the author and activist is coming back to Detroit, with a talk and book signing on Thursday at Southfield Public Library.…