Tuesday, July 16News That Matters

Tag: Fighting

Open thread for night owls: Net neutrality politics is local, and locals are fighting for it

Open thread for night owls: Net neutrality politics is local, and locals are fighting for it

Politics
Timothy Karr is the senior director of strategy for Free Press. At CommonDreams, he writes—Net Neutrality Politics Is Local: It’s easy for cloistered Washington politicos to assume that Net Neutrality is dead, undone in December by the Trump FCC and its Verizon-friendly chairman, Ajit Pai. But any elected official who follows O’Neill’s advice and walks beyond the Beltway is hearing a very different story. In the eight weeks since the FCC voted to take away Net Neutrality, a groundswell of activism by local advocates and politicians has revived prospects for lasting open-internet safeguards. Elected officials in more than 25 states (see below) have introduced measures to prevent large phone and cable companies like AT&T, Comcast and Verizon from blocking, throttling or otherwise int
Kratom users fighting regulators over herb they say saves lives

Kratom users fighting regulators over herb they say saves lives

Breaking News
ST. LOUIS, Mo. - Citizens and regulators are butting heads over a centuries-old substance appearing in drug screens of people who are dying. Depending on who you ask, Kratom is either a health risk or a savior. The DEA was about to classify Kratom a Schedule I narcotic, putting it in the same category as heroin and LSD. Tens of thousands of people protested online and the government ultimately backed down. Kratom is usually sold in green powder form. It comes from a plant in the coffee family called mitragyna. We're hearing more about it now because many users are saying the herb is saving their lives. Meanwhile, the FDA has called it a possibly addictive and deadly opiate. Fox 2/KPLR 11 spoke with a man who uses it. He asked we only use his first name, Scott. "Kratom is more about what i...
A family’s reckoning: Fighting the opioid epidemic at home

A family’s reckoning: Fighting the opioid epidemic at home

Breaking News
GLENS FALLS, N.Y. (NEWS10) – Imagine the pain that would come from losing both a brother and sister to a drug overdose. Sadly, one local family is trying to make sense of it all, and now looking for allies in their fight against the opioid crisis. Exactly six weeks ago, Bob Dean lost his sister to a heroin overdose. In 2016, he lost his brother the same way. Now, Bob and his family are taking a closer look at how we got here, and what we all can do to stop the epidemic. “I hope I can keep her name alive, otherwise people just disappear. It’s just another statistic,” Bob said. Angie was the sister you could count on. “If you said I love you, she would always say I love you more,” Judy Viger, Angie’s sister, said. She was lively, healthy and happy but her story took a tur
This Scientist Was Abused As A Child By A Relative. She's Fighting For Other Adult Survivors To See Justice.

This Scientist Was Abused As A Child By A Relative. She's Fighting For Other Adult Survivors To See Justice.

What's Hot
Purnima Govindarajulu Supplied NEW DELHI — An Indian scientist who was repeatedly abused as a child by a family member is on the verge of a major victory to help other victims bring their abusers to justice.Purnima Govindarajulu’s years-long campaign to make reporting child sexual abuse for adult survivors easier in India is finally having an impact, after a minister promised to look into amending the law.Govindarajulu, a scientist based in British Columbia, Canada, has spent the past two years reliving the excruciating nightmare of the abuse she endured as a child from her cousin’s husband, taking months off from her job to campaign and raise awareness about the issues survivors face.The 53-year-old, who suffered abuse up until the age of 13 at her family home...
Mattis Promises DREAMers In The Military That The Country They're Fighting For Won't Deport Them

Mattis Promises DREAMers In The Military That The Country They're Fighting For Won't Deport Them

What's Hot
Saul Loeb / AFP / Getty Images In a rare assurance to young immigrants serving in the military who were brought to the US illegally by their parents, Defense Secretary James Mattis on Thursday said they would continue to be protected from deportation even if their current legal protections expire next month.“We would always stand by one of our people,” Mattis told reporters at the Pentagon. "Our guys on active duty, and that sort of thing … are not in any kind of jeopardy.”The Pentagon chief said he confirmed that position in a phone call earlier on Thursday with Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen. He said the two had gone over the issue “in great detail.”The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, is set to expire...