Sunday, April 22News That Matters

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Homie raises $4M to help London’s ‘Generation Rent’ find their next property

Homie raises $4M to help London’s ‘Generation Rent’ find their next property

Breaking News
 Another nascent proptech startup targeting ‘Generation Rent’ is London-based Homie, which might best be described as a concierge-style service that promises to save Londoner’s time, hassle and money when going in search of their next rental property. Today the company is disclosing that it has raised a further $4 million in Seed funding in a round led by Connect Ventures. Read More
Student helps prevent potential school shooting

Student helps prevent potential school shooting

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(NEWS10) – Police in Vermont are crediting a New York State teen and a high school resource officer for thwarting a possible school shooting. The alleged threat first came to light 160 miles away from the school in Vermont. It was here in Dutchess County, New York where a concerned high school student showed a disturbing text message to her school’s resource officer. The student told the officer she had messages on her phone from an acquaintance plotting a mass shooting at a school in Vermont. This was just days after the deadly shooting in Parkland, Florida and after news that law enforcement failed to act on tips about the accused shooter. Back in Dutchess County the school resource officer took action and contacted law enforcement in Vermont regarding an 18-year-old named Jack S
Parents offer opposing opinions on raffling off firearms to raise money

Parents offer opposing opinions on raffling off firearms to raise money

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ST. PETERS, MO - Some local youth sports parents are weighing in on the decision of a Neosho youth team to raise money by raffling off an AR-15.  Organizers of that raffle have been criticized by some who point out the AR-15 was the type of firearm used in the Florida school shooting that took 17 lives. There was a mix of opinions at Gametime Sports in St. Peters Monday night.  Some parents did not see a problem with the raffle while others believed it was in poor taste. “It’s not the gun that kills, it’s the people behind them,” said one parent. “It’s not right.  It’s in bad taste,” said another parent. Firearm raffles are not uncommon.  We found the website 52gunraffle.com.  One upcoming raffle features an AR-15 style firearm. AR-15 style rifles were banned in the United States in 1994
Citizens lead the charge to unincorporate Hanley Hills

Citizens lead the charge to unincorporate Hanley Hills

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ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. - Some of the citizens in a north St. Louis County village are leading a charge to unincorporate their municipality and return under the auspices of the county government. The residents are trying to collect enough signatures to put the measure on the ballot for voters to decide. One of the things citizens in Hanley Hills don't like is all the money being spent to pay trustees. There are nine trustees in Hanley Hills, a village of about 2,000 people. They each make $400 a month. But trustees like Thomas Rusan said the village has about $1.5 million in street repairs that are needed, but the village doesn't have the funds to make the repairs. The village has declined dramatically over the years. It's gone from a town where most residents were homeowners, to one where ...
Sony Corp. to launch an AI-based taxi-hailing service in Japan

Sony Corp. to launch an AI-based taxi-hailing service in Japan

Breaking News
 Sony Corporation said today that it will build an AI-based ride-hailing system in Japan in partnership with five taxi companies. The service will use artificial intelligence to manage taxi dispatches and forecast demand based on factors like weather, traffic and local events. Sony’s announcement came just before Uber chief executive officer Dara Khosrowshahi, who is currently visiting… Read More
New exhibit examines Native American imagery in US culture

New exhibit examines Native American imagery in US culture

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FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Bold. Visionary. A spectacular success. The words in an online promotion for a new museum exhibit in Washington, D.C., describe an 1830 U.S. law that forced thousands of American Indians from their lands in the South to areas west of the Mississippi River. Provocative, yes, says the co-curator of the exhibit “Americans” that opened last month at the National Museum of the American Indian. Bold and visionary in imagining a country free of American Indians. A spectacular success in greatly expanding wealth from cotton fields where millions of blacks worked as slaves. “When you’re in the show, you understand bold and visionary become tongue in cheek,” co-curator Cecile Ganteaume said. The exhibit that runs through 2022 has opened to good reviews and pushes the national